Nominations Open for the lsu Elihle Awards 2021 – Africa

Deadline: 30-Apr-21
Media Monitoring Africa (MMA) is excited to officially open the nominations for the 2021 lsu Elihle Awards to contribute to a change in attitudes and behaviours of opinion and decision-makers and citizens across the country and continent from the premise that the media frames debates in society and carries enormous influence and, therefore, ability to drive positive change. This year marks five years since these Awards were launched.

“Isu Elihle” is an isiZulu phrase and could be translated into English as a beautiful, great or simply a neat solution. The Isu Elihle Awards were launched in 2016 by MMA with the support of Save the Children International, the Swedish International Development Agency and Media Network on Child Rights Development (MNCRD) based in Zambia.

These Awards aim to encourage journalist to highlight issues that are faced by children in the continent. Journalist from more than twenty countries has applied in the previous years and diverse issues about children have been raised. This shows that these awards have gained a lot of traction within the continent. They encourage journalist to submit their unique story ideas within the started time frame.

Award Details

Journalists behind these ideas will each receive guaranteed financial support of ZAR 10 000. MMA will also offer support to the finalists to develop their concepts. The final stories will be ranked and the final cash prizes will be awarded as follows:

  • ZAR 25 000 (Overall Winner);
  • ZAR 15 000 (2nd place);
  • ZAR 10 000 (Third Place).

Eligibility Criteria

  • The Competition is open to professional journalists, whether directly employed or freelancers, working in the continent of Africa.
  • No entry fee is payable.
  • Employees and the immediate families of Media Monitoring Africa (MMA) are not eligible to participate in the competition.
  • The Competition is held in English. Therefore all entries and story ideas should be in English.
  • Applicants are strictly limited to a maximum of one entry; however, each media house can have as many applicants as it wishes.
  • Late, incomplete, illegible and/or fraudulent entries will be disqualified.
  • MMA reserves the right to refuse entries that do not comply with the above rules. No correspondence will be entered into in this regard.
  • A panel of distinguished, independent judges with appropriate knowledge and experience of children and the media will judge the competition. The panel of judges will be determined by MMA at their sole discretion. Children will also be part of the judging panel
  • No handwritten applications will be accepted. All applications must be completed online using the online form.
  • The judges reserve the right to transfer entries for consideration in other categories at their discretion, for instance the Isu Elihle Mandy Rossouw Accountability Category.
  • The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  • The top six journalists selected by the panel of judges will be taken to the final story-writing round of the competition. MMA will provide financial support to enable the journalists to write and complete their stories in the timeline provided. All finalists will be individually responsible and accountable to MMA for their costs. The journalist is also required to provide MMA with invoices and any other supporting documents for all expenditure related to production of the story. Any irregular expenditure will lead to the finalist being disqualified and being held liable for the amount.
  • Should MMA require the top six finalists to travel as part of the Awards or related activities, sufficient notice will be given, however each finalist will be required to arrange for their visas and any other documentation required for travel. MMA will cover for travel and accommodation costs.
  • Finalists will be expected to be available for the duration of the programme and participate fully in the calendar of events that are expected to take place on those dates as indicated under the Isu Elihle Awards Timeline.
  • Journalists must acknowledge that this is only a competition and the awarding of any prize does not give rise to an employment agency or joint venture relationship or arrangement between journalists and MMA.
  • The top six finalists should send a written confirmation from mainstream media acknowledging that they will be publishing their story otherwise the journalist may be disqualified. MMA must be acknowledged in the published story i.e (This reporting was supported by Media Monitoring Africa (MMA) as part of the Isu Elihle Awards.
  • Individuals and media houses enter this competition at their own risk. MMA and its affiliates cannot be held liable for any injury or accidents, fatalities or damage incurred whilst participating in this competition.
  • By submitting your entry, you confirm that you have read and agree with these rules and agree that should you be in breach of the terms, you may be disqualified from the competition.
  • Journalists must submit new story ideas and not ones that have been previously published
  • Journalists are encouraged to submit high standard work.

Judging Criteria

  • The focus on or extensive voice given to children or an issue that impacts children. Children are defined as any persons between the ages of 0-17.
  • Consideration for the best interests of children and the ethical manner in which children are treated and given a voice in the story. Journalists must adhere to ethical practices and principles in the planning and execution of the story as MMA will not tolerate the violation of children’s rights in any shape or form.
  • Fresh, innovative, and different perspective to children’s issues and/or investigative angle undertaken to report on issue.
  • Must be able to complete the story in the period allowed.
  • Clarity of the issue and extent to which story engages and captures audiences. The story could be about an area that is not commonly given a children’s angle such as the economy or economic impact on children, land issues, investment or an existing news story and giving it a children’s focus.
  • Stories need to highlight possible solutions to the problem or issues that children face.
  • Extent to which story challenges common negative stereotypes about the roles of children in society, especially within the gender debate.
  • The story should also explore relevant legislation of policy issues related to the issue being explored.

For more information, visit http://www.isuelihle.org/

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